Saveliin Uuskula

Contact:
saveliin.uuskyla@gmail.com
University/School:
Coventry University
Location:
Coventry
Specialism:
Accessory DesignFashion DesignHeritage & CultureSustainabiltyTextilesWomenswear
About Me

Hi! I’m Saveliin, a textiles graduate from Coventry University.

Saveliin challenges the idea of disposable fashion with her project by focusing on longevity; exploring how storytelling and videography could help people develop long-lasting connections with their belongings. She follows sustainability principles in her practise by using low-impact materials and processes.

“I believe we should treasure every piece of clothing and the unique stories behind them. What are they made of? Who made them? How are they made? Where are they made? Why are they made? Then we will think twice before bringing new clothes into our lives. We will start taking care of them, instead of discarding them after few uses. It will benefit us, the society and the planet. As designers, we also need to be mindful of our choices to make fashion more sustainable. Starting with little changes and strive for improvements can make a difference in the long run,” says Saveliin.

INSPIRATION

The starting point of inspiration was Richard Sennet's book "The Craftsman".

Sennet argues that the convenience of getting rid of objects damages the deeper connection we have with our belongings; it really resonated with me. After visiting Collect 2020 modern art & craft fair, I appreciated the powerful connection between the artist and the client; by sharing unique stories and processes behind their creations. I didn’t just want to make garments. I wanted to take people on the journey with me, throughout all stages of creating my collection.

Voluminous shapes were inspired by contemporary ceramics, which allowed me to experiment with adaptable elements. Nature was the source for embroidery designs. I used photographs of plants from the visit to Fairchild Botanic Garden in Miami 2018. Instead of replicating the flowers, I concentrated on the textures and how I could achieve them with different embroidery techniques like goldwork, bead and hand embroidery. These designs were further developed into digital prints to achieve heavily beaded look.

MY WORK

PORTFOLIOS

DETAIL

Detachable embroidery panels and sustainability.

Embroidery is a craft I’m passionate about. I love its array of techniques and long history. By pushing those boundaries, my aim is to keep the craft alive as well as relevant to contemporary fashion. In this project I fused together beading, goldwork and hand embroidery to create a 3D effect and highlight various depths and textures. Sustainability is the new norm, thus through my project I explore the idea of extending the life of textiles by transforming them into something other than fashion. Each individual artefact can be worn on clothing, but also can be put together into a decorative piece to display around the household. This way they are designed to last for generations rather than disposed every season. Additionally, each panel has a QR code attached, which will direct the wearer or the audience to my website, where people can easily learn more about the item. Most materials used are second hand or remnant, except beading thread and goldwork supplies for durability and quality.

“We truly can live with fewer, better things. All we need to do is pay closer attention.” - Glenn Adamson
Accessory DesignFashion DesignHeritage & CultureSustainabiltyTextilesWomenswear
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