Jesus Florentino C Ramirez Barron

Contact:
info@florentinobarron.co.uk
University/School:
Liverpool John Moores
Location:
Liverpool
Specialism:
Award NomineeFashion DesignFashion ImageHeritage & CultureMenswearWomenswear
About Me

A fashion designer graduate from LJMU inspired by history and nature

I believe that fashion has the power to change and influence on people’s mood, and this was explored in my dissertation - such as self-esteem and the need to be unique and accepted by society.

I have always been fascinated in fashion from an early age - I thank my grandma and her wonderful magazines for this (Vogue & Cosmopolitan). Growing up in rural Mexico where there were no fashion schools, my first priority was to educate myself to be able to go and see the world and experience different cultures.

INSPIRATION

As a descendent of the Mayans, their culture inspired me, forming my earliest and happiest memories.

Mayan people have suffered historically since the conquest, often seen as cheap labour and discriminated against when trying to better themselves. As a descendant of the Mayans, who grew up in a small village called Buctzotz; life was simple, and education wasn’t easy. I believe, that if we can get the world’s attention, we can be visible. We are part of society, and we are more than worthy of contributing to it. We are proud of our traditions, and we want to celebrate our aesthetics with the world.

Mayans often have a zero-waste concept and followed nature. Historically, their clothing was made with natural fibres. Mayans tend to live a minimalistic life, only keeping hold of things that are of necessity to them. Historically they have fallen behind and often experience inequality due to the lack of visibility, education, and lack of presence in the media. They don’t often receive any support or credit that they deserve.

MY WORK

PORTFOLIOS

DETAIL

Clothes have the power to empower people and affect mood

My collection celebrates Mayan aesthetics and architecture with the use of minimal wastage. For 1000s of years, civilisations produced clothes that were kind to the planet and had great aesthetics. The Mayans were no exception. Everything was organic, influenced by angles, geometry, and numbers. I believe if we return to the basics, we can improve the damage that the fashion industry currently causes to the planet and to humans. Denim has properties similar to heneken textile, a natural fibre used by the Mayans. Nearly extinct due to the mass production of artificial textiles from the 1950s. I was inspired by the goddess Ixchel – who has come to life through my main garment - represented on the main skirt with cyanotype printing of Mayas. She’s angry and wants to scream and demands better treatment for her children. The God Kukulkan the traveller wears his red attire, ready to protect his people, and fulfill his prophecy that he will return one day.

After colonisation, the Mayans have been quiet people, losing their cultural identity and voice. Mak’a Chi means “Keep your lips closed” telling everyone that it is their time to talk.
Award NomineeFashion DesignFashion ImageHeritage & CultureMenswearWomenswear
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