Jennifer Scott

Contact:
jenny.scott56@googlemail.com
University/School:
Manchester Fashion Institute
Location:
Manchester
Specialism:
Atelier DesignAward WinnerEco / Zero Waste DesignFashion DesignFashion TechnologyWomenswear
About Me

Manchester Fashion Institute graduate 2023.

My design practice focuses around pattern cutting, in both traditional and creative ways. I like to merge the two in my practice, to create outcomes which reap the benefits of having a multi-disciplinary approach. I am seeking to become a creative pattern cutter in my career, and aim to have this at the centre of my concept generation.

I believe my approach with digital pattern making help to create less of an environmental impact during my process, by using less paper, material and time. I feel strongly about pattern making and its impact on fashion, as I believe at the heart of people and community, well fitting clothes that help people feel more relaxed and powerful has an important impact. I hope that with more training in tailoring and pattern making (physical and digital) I can become a practitioner who truly considers these issues into their practice.

INSPIRATION

My preliminary research began at the myth of Narcissus.

Which tells the cautionary tale of falling in love with ones reflection. Upon researching this myth, I unearthed responses in many different kinds, such as the work of Bill Brandt, a 19030’s surrealist photographer who distorts the female form in a way that desexualises and reinterprets femininity. I found this conceptually resonates with my own working practice. I am always gravitated towards hiding or disguising within womenswear, and how traditional clothing can be distorted to have a new narrative.

I am fascinated with traditional pattern making and construction, and decided to use this as the base of my collection, using commonplace garments to then distort into 3D responses to my research. I began with literal interpretations of this, such as wearing jeans as a suit jacket, or buttoning a shirt the wrong way. I have tried to replicate traditional and recognisable garments, whilst manipulating them to bring them back to my design language.

MY WORK

PORTFOLIOS

DETAIL

High quality, handcraft finishing to begin the non-commodification of digital practice.

The details of my collection looked to traditional tailoring, finishes and luxury additions to hone in on the purpose of my collection. I aimed to use digital practices in an almost unrecognisable way, thus creating clothes which are still sustainable in a quality and craftsmanship aspect, whilst still using digital practices to save time and materials.

There is a fine balance between the success of innovative technologies, and the power of handcraft. I like to merge the two in my practice.
Atelier DesignAward WinnerEco / Zero Waste DesignFashion DesignFashion TechnologyWomenswear
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